GET STARTED
1
Request Info
2
Visit
3
Apply
GET STARTED
1
Request Info
2
Visit
3
Apply

News at UM Public Health Sciences

The Department of Public Health Sciences is actively working internationally, nationally, and locally to promote health and reduce the burden of disease. Faculty, research staff, students, and alumni conduct research on drug and alcohol abuse, HIV, cancer, diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and other illnesses that threaten the health of our city, our state, our nation, and the world. Learn more about the cutting-edge research and stay up to date with updates on the department here. 

For media inquiries regarding the Department of Public Health Sciences, please contact Margie Jimenez, M.A., C.R.A., assistant chair, at mjimenez5@miami.edu, and Amanda Torres, writer, at axt785@miami.edu.

one U

United Against Racism: Statement of Commitment

The Department of Public Health Sciences repudiates the racism and disregard for human lives our nation witnessed and experienced with the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd at the hands of police. The Department of Public Health Sciences endorses the statements released on May 29th by the American Public Health Association (APHA) and the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health (ASSPH) and calls for action now. Join us as we challenge the systemic and structural barriers that support racism and social injustice.

The Florida Node Alliance Renewed for an Additional Five Years

In the five-year renewal period, the Florida Node Alliance aims to apply their expertise in implementation science, data science, and the use of electronic health records to promote learning health care systems that build on precision medicine principles by implementing and refining methods to predict individual response to treatment.

New Department-Led Seminars to Shed Light on Emerging Public Health Challenges

The Department of Public Health Sciences has implemented Emerging Public Health Topics Seminars that will take place during the Fall 2020 semester. The first of three recent took place recently, which covered information on protecting populations from COVID-19 and an active hurricane season.

Public Health Experts to Serve as Directors of Graduate Programs in Prevention Science and Community Health

Sara St. George, Ph.D., assistant professor, and Eric Brown, Ph.D., associate professor, both from the Miller School of Medicine’s Department of Public Health Sciences, will serve as the new directors for graduate programs in prevention science and community health.

New Paper Highlights Challenges and Innovations in Latinx Health Disparities Research Amid COVID-19

Experts at the Miller School of Medicine and School of Nursing and Health Studies describe the challenges and innovative research methods developed to continue Latinx health disparities research amid COVID-19.

Study Finds Association Between Social Determinants of Health and HIV Control in Miami-Dade County

Social determinants of health, such as economic stability, education, and health and healthcare, are associated with an increased number of people living with uncontrolled HIV—defined as out of treatment or with a detectable HIV viral load—in ZIP codes within Miami-Dade.

Unprecedented Times Lead to Increased Interest in Public Health

The Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has seen an increase in applications for the 2020 to 2021 academic year, with a 56 percent increase in applicants compared to 2019 to 2020. Also notable is that 84 students began their graduate education in public health this past August—approximately twice the number of students enrolled when compared to Fall 2019.

Visual Thinking Strategies Improve Observational Skills among Miller School Students, Study Finds

Visual Thinking Strategies, a facilitated method of guiding students in analyzing a preselected piece of visual art, positively impacts the total number of words students used to describe clinical images, the time they spent analyzing the images, and the number of clinically relevant observations they made.

Experts Find Association between African Dust Transport and Acute Exacerbations of COPD

Saharan dust outbreaks observed in Miami elevates the concentration of particulate matter exposure—an exposure that can affect both the lungs and heart. The outbreaks can also increase the risk of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a chronic inflammatory lung disease that causes obstructive airflow in the lungs.

Climate-Driven Atlantic Hurricanes and COVID-19 Transmission: Mitigating between the Concurrent Threats

In a paper published in the July issue of Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, a multi-disciplinary group of experts have provided critical information on the intersection of climate-driven Atlantic hurricanes and COVID-19 transmission – highlighting the complexities and potential solutions to addressing these two threats.

UM Entomologist Shares Insight on South Florida’s West Nile Virus and Dengue Fever Cases

In Miami-Dade County, there have been nearly two dozen locally transmitted West Nile virus cases so far this year, including eight reported in July. As of July 28, Monroe County has reported 22 cases of dengue. The West Nile virus is the leading cause of mosquito-borne disease in the United States. Dengue fever, an important mosquito-borne disease worldwide, is also transmitted by infected mosquitoes.

$4.9 Million NIDA-Funded Study to Examine a Behavioral Intervention to Optimize PrEP Adherence in Sexual Minority Men Who Use Stimulants

The National Institute on Drug Abuse awarded Adam Carrico, Ph.D., professor in the Miller School of Medicine’s Department of Public Health Sciences and director of the Division of Prevention Science and Community Health, a $4.9 million grant to conduct a multi-site randomized controlled trial in South Florida and San Francisco.

boliviacovid_hero_940x529

COVID-19 is ravaging Latin America

In a virtual seminar hosted by the Institute for Advanced Study of the Americas and the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, participants presented projections for deaths in the region. Latin America continues to be a “hot spot” for COVID-19. The region has just 8 percent of the world’s population, yet it accounts for 43 percent of the deaths worldwide.

first-responders-480x320

Miller School Public Health Researchers Study COVID-19 Antibodies in First Responders

The international peer-reviewed journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine has released a report by a team from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine on the prevalence of COVID-19 antibodies in a group of South Florida firefighters/paramedics.

UM to Launch COVID-19 Vaccine Testing Site for the COVID-19 Prevention Trials Network

Led by infectious diseases expert Susanne Doblecki-Lewis, M.D., M.S.P.H., associate professor of clinical medicine and alumna of the Master of Science in Public Health Program in the Department of Public Health Sciences, the initiative at the Miller School of Medicine is part of a large-scale study established by the NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

UM Researchers Receive $2.27 Million Grant to Study Neighborhood Greenness and Cardiometabolic Health among Hispanics

In Miami-Dade County, there have been nearly two dozen locally transmitted West Nile virus cases so far this year, including eight reported in July. Monroe County has reported 22 cases of dengue. The West Nile virus is the leading cause of mosquito-borne disease in the United States. Dengue fever, an important mosquito-borne disease worldwide, is also transmitted by infected mosquitoes.

Dr. Adam Carrico Awarded NIH Grant to Study Risk for COVID amid Methamphetamine Use and HIV

Adam Carrico, Ph.D., professor with the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s Department of Public Health Sciences, has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to study how methamphetamine use and HIV could create an increased risk for infection with the novel coronavirus in sexual minority men. The population includes gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men.

CHERISH, a NIDA-Funded Center of Excellence, Renewed to Conduct Studies and Provide Guidance on Health Economic Research

Kathryn McCollister, Ph.D., a professor in the Miller School of Medicine’s Department of Public Health Sciences, has been awarded as subcontract principal investigator on a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) grant under a 5-year renewal, where she and an interdisciplinary group of experts in health economics, infectious diseases, and health services research will continue to conduct innovative research and provide consultation and training services from the Center for Health Economics of Treatment Interventions for Substance Use Disorder, HCV, and HIV (CHERISH).